A comparison of jane eyre by charlotte brontes and wide sargasso sea by jean rhyss

Jean Rhys and Charlotte Bronte The use of symbolism in the presentation of characters by Jenia Geraghty I began to see and acknowledge the hand of God in my doom. I began to experience remorse, repentance; the wish for reconcilement to my Maker I often wonder who I am and where is my country and where do I belong and why was I ever born at all Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys composed their novels in different centuries and came from very different backgrounds. However despite these disparities the use of symbolism in their narratives can be compared.

A comparison of jane eyre by charlotte brontes and wide sargasso sea by jean rhyss

Themes and motifs are constantly repeated in Bronte's 'Jane 'Eyre'. And these are taken up, again, in Rhys's 'Wide Sargasso Sea'. We recognise patterns and parallels, throughout both stories.

A comparison of jane eyre by charlotte brontes and wide sargasso sea by jean rhyss

However, there is more to this ostensibly two-dimensional character. The 'cunning' Bertha, whose 'vices sprang up fast and rank', is 'a bad, mad, and embruted partner'; Jane, however, is 'discreet' and 'thoroughly modest and sensible'. The contrast is both mental and physical. Rochester criticises women with 'a perspective of flatness, triviality, … imbecility, coarseness, and ill-temper'.

In Jane, he found a 'clear eye and eloquent tongue'; in Bertha he perceived a 'cast of mind common, low, narrow, and singularly incapable of being led to anything higher'.

Comparison of Jane Eyre with Wide Sargasso Sea

She is blamed, hated and considered a curse. Thus Bronte implies that Bertha, too, is in need of 'correction' for her foreign 'defects'. While Bertha may be considered the antagonist of Jane, she is also her literary double.

Like Jane, she falls in love with Rochester. Like Jane, she is passionate. At the age of ten, after fighting off her bullying cousin, Jane, far from being considered modest and good, was described, by her aunt, as 'the most wicked and abandoned child ever reared' and 'a picture of passion'.

Bronte emphasises the similarities by incarcerating both characters; Jane as a child and Bertha as an adult. As with Bertha, Jane's mental health is questioned.

The servants were 'incredulous of [her] sanity' and believed that 'it was always in her'. Rochester claims that Bertha 'came of a mad family', the inference being that 'it was always in her', too.

A comparison of jane eyre by charlotte brontes and wide sargasso sea by jean rhyss

Jane felt like a 'revolted slave'; Bertha came from the slave-ridden West Indies. Mad Woman in the Attic.Wild Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys - beautiful, dramatic prose set in the West Indies.

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Jean Rhys' novel Wide Sargasso Sea endeavors to create a back story to Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. Comparing Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte In the novels Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, the theme of loss can be viewed as an umbrella that encompasses the absence of independence, society or community, love, and order in the lives of the two protagonists.

Comparing Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea Jean Rhys obviously had Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre in mind while writing Wide Sargasso Sea. Each novel contains events that echo other events or themes in the other.

Her grand attempt to tell what she felt was the story of Jane Eyre's 'madwoman in the attic', Bertha Rochester, Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea is edited with an introduction and notes by Angela Smith in Penguin Classics.

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Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea Compare & Contrast. and is only given a marginalized voice by Jean Rhys because of her dissatisfaction with Bertha’s destiny. In Wide Sargasso Sea, and its long lasting effects that seep into Charlotte Bronte’s novel.

In Jane Eyre, Jane is a champion for Victorian women as she exemplifies the.

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6 Jane Eyre Introduction: Charlotte Brontë’s Celebrated Heroine Virginia Woolf’s The Common Reader contains a reading of Jane Eyre () that exemplifies the terms in which Charlotte Brontë’s novel has been celebrated.

Comparison of Introductions of Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea by Maisie Harrison on Prezi